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Go into the water ...

 
"You can only learn to swim in the water"
 
I know this theorem from my youth. It means something like "outside the pool and only with theory you will never learn to stay afloat and to move effectively through swimming movements." I think this statement is correct and I always find parallels to the martial art. But what does martial arts have to do with swimming?
 
Someone who - for whatever reason - falls into a lake, into deep water, has two options: Either he manages to keep himself afloat by swimming or he drowns. The one who has learned swimming techniques has a clear advantage. The more often he swims, the greater the chance of getting out of this situation alive. If the water is particularly cold or very restless when there are currents, then a good swimming routine suddenly becomes particularly advantageous. It really doesn't matter how many different swimming techniques you know or how many badges can be seen on your swimming trunks. It is rather crucial that you master your learned swimming technique without thinking, that you are physically in good shape and mentally strong enough not to panic in order to be able to focus. Then you have a good chance of reaching the saving bank.

Someone who, for whatever reason, gets into an unavoidable physical argument, has two options: Either they manage to defend themselves through effective defense, or they suffer injuries, are robbed, or worse. The one who has learned defense techniques has a clear advantage. The more often he practices them practically, the greater the chance to get out of this situation unscathed. If the attacker is particularly strong and aggressive, or maybe there are two attackers, a practical routine in the so-called Hosinsul suddenly becomes particularly advantageous. It really doesn't matter how many techniques you know, which degrees or titles have been achieved. It is rather crucial that you have mastered your learned, suitable techniques without thinking, that you are physically in good shape and mentally so firm that you cannot panic and focus. Then you have a good chance of being able to defend yourself in such a situation. As with swimming, it is important to learn techniques and practice them again and again. Perfection must be the path that the martial artist follows for a lifetime without ever reaching the goal. Through elementary school (Gibon Yeonseup), forms (Poomsae, Hyong) and single or multi-step combat (Ilbo Taeryon, Ibo Taeryon, ...) this is a lifelong part of martial arts training. As already described, the martial artist must also “go into the water”, that is, he must learn to use the techniques intuitively and in a controlled manner in stressful situations. In addition to sparring in various forms of competition, Hosinsul training should also be carried out with a certain realistic backdrop. Creativity can be given free rein. Artificially build up stress through time pressure and a loud background noise, training in "street clothes" are possibilities.
 
However, training the mind is at least as important, because only those who can keep calm and clear, who can accept a threatening situation, can also survive "on stormy seas". Breathing and focus training must therefore be part of good training.
 
Timo Meusel
 
 
Timo Meusel
Qualitästsmanager
3. Dan Taekwondo
6. Kup Hapkido
Baumberger Taekwondofreunde e.V.  Coesfeld / Nottuln